Intensification of agriculture a study in the plains of Uttar Pradesh by Susanta K. Ray

Cover of: Intensification of agriculture | Susanta K. Ray

Published by Hindustan Pub. Corp. (India) in Delhi .

Written in English

Read online

Places:

  • India,
  • Uttar Pradesh.

Subjects:

  • Agriculture -- India -- Uttar Pradesh.,
  • Agricultural productivity -- India -- Uttar Pradesh.,
  • Cropping systems -- India -- Uttar Pradesh.,
  • Agricultural laborers -- India -- Uttar Pradesh.,
  • Agricultural innovations -- India -- Uttar Pradesh.,
  • Agricultural intensification -- India -- Uttar Pradesh.

Edition Notes

Book details

StatementSusanta K. Ray.
SeriesStudies in economic development and planning ;, no. 38
Classifications
LC ClassificationsS471.I32 U863 1985
The Physical Object
Paginationxii, 138 p. ;
Number of Pages138
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2693781M
LC Control Number85902905

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Book Description. Sustainable intensification (SI) has emerged in recent years as a powerful new conceptualisation of agricultural sustainability and has been widely adopted in policy circles and debates.

It is defined as a process or system where yields are increased without adverse environmental impact and without the cultivation of more land. Book Description. Sustainable Intensification (SI) has recently emerged as a key concept for agricultural development, recognising that yields must increase to feed a growing world population, but it must be achieved without damage to the environment, on finite land.

This book on agricultural development and sustainable intensification by Dr. Udaya Sekhar Nagothu is therefore a timely one.

I hope it will be read and used widely." - M. Swaminathan, UNESCO Chair in Ecotechnology and Founder Chairman, athan Research Foundation, IndiaBrand: Routledge. The intensification of agriculture has caused dramatic declines in farmland biodiversity (Carvalheiro et al., ; Senapathi et al., ).

Since the s, agricultural policies have been developed in Europe to mitigate this loss through agri-environmental schemes (AES). Sustainable intensification (SI): is a recently developed concept that is understood in different ways by its critics and supporters. A common understanding is that it denotes the principle of increasing or maintaining the productivity of agriculture on existing farmland while at the same time, reducing its environmental impacts.

intensification include a compulsion to work harder and more regularly, changing work habits and raising overall productivity; intensification facilitates the division of labor and the spread of urbanization, communication, and education, as well as population and urban growth which stimulates the further intensification of Size: KB.

Co-written by Jules Pretty, one of the pioneers of the concept and internationally known and respected authority on sustainable agriculture, this book sets out current thinking and debates around sustainable agriculture and by:   Sustainable intensification (SI) has emerged in recent years as a powerful new conceptualisation of agricultural sustainability and has been widely adopted in policy circles and debates.

It is defined as a process or system where yields are increased without adverse environmental impact and without the cultivation of more by: 1. Can science suggest new and improved approaches to reducing the conflict between productive land use and biodiversity conservation. There are many different viewpoints about the best way to deal with the myriad issues associated with land use intensification and this book canvasses a number of these from different parts of the tropical and temperate world.

Sustainable intensification has recently been developed and adopted as a key concept and driver for research and policy in sustainable agriculture.

It includes ecological, economic and social dimensions, where food and nutrition security, gender and equity are crucial components. This book describes different aspects of systems research in agriculture in its broadest sense, where the focus is.

Sustainable intensification of agriculture – Challenges and opportunities L. WIESE Dept. of Soil Science, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch,Western Cape, South Africa ([email protected]) Correlation between human population growth and agricultural intensification (increase.

3 History, Ethics, and Intensification in Agriculture 67 as an effective agent to protect soldiers and ci vilians against malaria-bearing mosquitoes, typhus-bearing lice, and other insect pests. This chapter defines agricultural intensification, its components, and ecosystem service delivery within row cropping systems.

Particular attention is given to the homogenizing effects of intensive agriculture on vertical soil organic carbon distributions, soil structure, soil moisture and nutrient levels, and pesticide influences on ecosystem.

Conservation Agriculture is a farming system that promotes minimum soil disturbance (i.e. no tillage), maintenance of a permanent soil cover, and diversification Intensification of agriculture book plant species.

It enhances biodiversity and natural biological processes above and below the ground surface, which contribute to increased water and nutrient use efficiency and to improved and sustained crop production.

Get this from a library. The Ethics of sustainable agricultural intensification. [Peter E Kenmore; Clive Stannard; Paul B Thompson; Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.;] -- This report explores three possible approaches to an ethical analysis of agricultural intensification strategies.

Human food needs provide the basis for an utilitarian argument for intensification. Sustainable intensification practices can increase smallholder yields, which, in theory, reduces demand to clear additional land. There is a gender gap in agriculture in low-income countries between the resources and rights available to men who work the land and those available to women who do the same.

* excerpted from the book. Sustainable Intensification of Agriculture one of the pioneers of the concept and internationally known and respected authority on sustainable agriculture, this book sets out current thinking and debates around sustainable agriculture and intensification.

It recognises that world population is. ith the publication of Save and Grow inFAO proposed a new paradigm of intensive crop production, one that is both highly productive and environmentally sustainable. FAO recognized that, over the past half-century, agriculture based on the intensive use of inputs has increased global food production and average per capita food Size: 5MB.

This advanced textbook covering the fundamentals and industry applications of process intensification (PI) discusses both the theoretical and conceptual basis of the discipline. Since interdisciplinarity is a key feature of PI, the material contained in the book reaches far beyond the classical area of chemical engineering.

Developments in other relevant disciplines, such as chemistry. Scholars have developed a number of hypotheses to explain the historical origins of agriculture. Studies of the transition from hunter-gatherer to agricultural societies indicate an antecedent period of intensification and increasing sedentism; examples are the Natufian culture in the Levant, and the Early Chinese Neolithic in t models indicate that wild stands that had been.

The Ethics of Agricultural Intensification: An Interdisciplinary and International Conversation Paul B. Thompson and John Otieno Ouko* Global agriculture faces a number of challenges as the world approaches the second decade of the third millennium.

Predictions unilaterally indicate dramatic. Genetic Intensification is one of the 3 pillars of Sustainable Intensification, alongside Ecological Intensification and Socio-Economic Intensification. Genetic Intensification includes ‘conventional plant breeding,’ ‘biotechnology,’ and ‘livestock breeding’ which incorporates elements of.

These challenges are further complicated by rapid changes in climate and its additional direct impacts on agriculture, biodiversity and ecological processes. There are many different viewpoints about the best way to deal with the myriad issues associated with land use intensification and this book canvasses a number of these from different Brand: CSIRO PUBLISHING.

ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: pages ; 23 cm. Contents: It could be a wonderful world --Twenty-first century agriculture and food --The sustainable intensification of agriculture --Does sustainable intensification work?--Sustainable intensification on smaller farms in developing countries --Sustainable intensification in.

If society continues to increase its level of intensification, eventually it will find itself practicing types of production that we would recognize as agriculture. This is what occurred in different regions dating f to 8, BC in the Fertile Crescent and perhaps BC in the Kuk Early Agricultural Site of : R.

Adam Dastrup, Ma, Gisp. Organic agriculture is a highly sustainable form of crop and livestock production [1] defined as a “system of farm management production that combines best environmental practices, a high level of biodiversity, the preservation of natural resources, the application of high animal welfare standards, and a production method using natural substances and processes.”.

By Adrian Martin and Laura Vang Rasmussen. Sustainable intensification of agriculture is seen by many in science and policy as a flagship strategy for helping to meet global social and ecological commitments - such as ending hunger and protecting biodiversity - as laid out in the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and Paris climate : Laura Vang Rasmussen.

The book provides a valuable resource for researchers, development actors, students and policy makers in agricultural systems and economics and in international development.

It highlights and addresses key challenges and opportunities that exist for sustainable agricultural intensification in the humid highlands of sub-Saharan Africa. Sustainable Intensification in Smallholder Agriculture book An integrated systems research approach Edited By Ingrid Oborn, Bernard Vanlauwe, Michael Phillips, Richard Thomas, Willemien Brooijmans, Kwesi Atta-KrahCited by: 1.

Book review: Land use intensification; effects on agriculture, biodiversity and ecological processes. There can be little doubt that there are truly colossal challenges associated with providing food, fibre and energy for an expanding world population without further accelerating already rapid rates of biodiversity loss and undermining the ecosystem processes on which we all depend.

These challenges are further complicated by rapid changes in climate and its additional direct impacts on Cited by:   Compatibility of the terms ‘sustainable’ and ‘intensification’ was hinted at in the s (e.g.

Raintree and Warner, ; Swaminathan, ), and then first used in conjunction in a paper examining the status and potential of African agriculture (Pretty, ).Cited by:   Global crop production tripled during the last 50 years, mainly by an increase in yield (production/area).

We show that the energy embedded in the main oil-based inputs (machinery, fuel, and fertilizers) increased worldwide at a rate at first larger, but in the last decades slower, than crop production, resulting in a recent overall improved energy-use efficiency (EUE).

This was explained by Cited by: Fraser D () Animal welfare and the intensification of animal production: an alternative interpretation.

FAO Readings in Ethics No. Food and Agriculture Organization of Cited by: 3. The System of Rice Intensification (SRI), developed on Madagascar in the s, is a holistic approach for sustainable rice cultivation.

It calls for: Planting single seedlings with more space between them, rather than by the handful and bunched closely together. Watering intermittently and allowing for dry spells, rather than using continuous.

The article summarizes the major schools of thought regarding how to face the dilemma, and advocates sustainable intensification of agriculture, relying on integrated use of a wide range of. The history of agriculture can be seen as a long process of intensification, as society sought to meet its ever-growing needs for food, feed and fiber by raising crop productivity [].Coupled with socio-economic development, population growth and growing global food demand, the pressure originated from the resource supply becomes greater, for example, increasingly fierce competition in land Cited by: 1.

Read "Sustainable Intensification in Smallholder Agriculture An integrated systems research approach" by available from Rakuten Kobo. Sustainable intensification has recently been developed and adopted as a key concept and driver for research and policy Brand: Taylor And Francis. The full text of the FAO intensification paper is followed by chapters that mount specific reactions to its relevance for agricultural technology, environmental protection, globalization and animal welfare, and these four topics are further discussed, debated and elaborated by eight commentary chapters.

Soil Health and Intensification of Agroecosystems examines the climate, environmental, and human effects on agroecosystems and how the existing paradigms must be revised in order to establish sustainable production. The increased demand for food and fuel exerts tremendous stress on all aspects of natural resources and the environment to satisfy an ever increasing world population, which.

rescue lobby; the new modernists; and those who advocate sustainable intensification. Sustainable intensification of agriculture is known to offer significant opportunities to improve food production. For the first time, data from some 63 sustainable agriculture projects and programmes have been drawn together to illustrate what can be Size: 84KB.This book contributes to the adoption of agricultural technology in general and to literature on the System of Rice Intensification (SRI) in particular by identifying the factors that influence the decision to adopt SRI and examining SRI’s impact on household income and yield.

The study alsoBrand: Springer Singapore.Oborn, I., Vanlauwe, B., Phillips, M., Thomas, R., Brooijmans, W. and Atta-Krah, K. (Eds). Sustainable intensification in smallholder agriculture: an integrated Cited by: 1.

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