Elves in Anglo-Saxon England Matters of Belief, Health, Gender and Identity (Anglo-Saxon Studies) (Anglo-Saxon Studies) by Alaric Hall

Cover of: Elves in Anglo-Saxon England | Alaric Hall

Published by Boydell Press .

Written in English

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Subjects:

  • British & Irish history: c 1000 to c 1500,
  • Social history,
  • History,
  • History - General History,
  • History: World,
  • England,
  • Medieval,
  • History / Medieval,
  • World history,
  • Anglo-Saxons,
  • Civilization, Anglo-Saxon,
  • Elves,
  • Religion

Book details

The Physical Object
FormatHardcover
Number of Pages240
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL8950549M
ISBN 101843832941
ISBN 109781843832942

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Elves in Anglo-Saxon England: Matters of Belief, Health, Gender and Identity (Anglo-Saxon Studies) (Volume 8) Paperback – Novem by Alaric Hall (Author) › Visit Amazon's Alaric Hall Page. Find all the books, read about the author, and more.

See search Cited Elves in Anglo-Saxon England book Anglo-Saxon elves [Old English ælfe] are one of the best attested non-Christian beliefs in early medieval Europe, but current interpretations of the evidence derive directly from outdated nineteenth- and early twentieth-century ating linguistic and textual approaches into an anthropologically-inspired framework, this book reassesses the full range of by: Elves and elf-belief during the Anglo-Saxon period are reassessed in this lively and provocative study.

Anglo-Saxon elves [Old English ælfe] are one of the best attested non-Christian beliefs in early medieval Europe, but current interpretations of the evidence derive directly from outdated nineteenth- and early twentieth-century scholarship. Download Elves In Anglo Saxon England books, Elves and elf-belief during the Anglo-Saxon period are reassessed in this lively and provocative study.

Perceptions Of The Prehistoric In Anglo Saxon England. Author: Sarah Semple Publisher: Oxford University Press ISBN: Size: MB Format: PDF, ePub.

Elves in Anglo-saxon England: Matters of Belief, Health, Gender and Identity, Hardcover by Hall, Alaric, ISBNISBNBrand New, Free shipping in the US Elves and elf-belief during the Anglo-Saxon period are reassessed in this lively and provocative study.

inspired framework, this book reassesses the full range of evidence relating to elves. With a new degree of reliability, it traces continuities and changes in medieval non-Christian beliefs, from pre-conversion times Elves in Anglo-Saxon England.

20 Old English. Boydell Press, - History - pages 0 Reviews Anglo-Saxon elves [Old English ælfe] are one of the best attested non-Christian beliefs in early medieval Europe, but current interpretations of.

Elves in Anglo-Saxon England. Book Description: Anglo-Saxon elves (Old English ælfe) are one of the best attested non-Christian beliefs in early medieval Europe, but current interpretations of the evidence derive directly from outdated nineteenth- and early twentieth-century scholarship.

Integrating linguistic and textual approaches into an. Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Anglo-Saxon Studies: Elves in Anglo-Saxon England: Matters of Belief, Health, Gender and Identity by Alaric Hall (Trade Cloth) at the best online prices at eBay.

Free shipping for many products. Elves in Anglo-Saxon England. 31 likes. Anglo-Saxon elves (Old English ælfe) are one of the best attested non-Christian beliefs in early medieval Europe. Anglo-Saxon elves (Old English?lfe) are one of the best attested non-Christian beliefs in early medieval Europe, but current interpretations of the evidence derive directly from outdated nineteenth- and early twentieth-century scholarship.

Elves in Anglo-Saxon England - by Alaric Hall March   Elves in Anglo-Saxon England - Matters of Belief, Health, Gender and Identity by Alaric Hall,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide/5(51). Format: Paperback Alaric Hall's Elves in Anglo-Saxon England is a scholarly work and like most academic texts is a bit dry and makes for slow reading.

However, despite that there are things to learn for the serious student of faerie lore, Anglo-Saxon culture or linguistics/5. TY - BOOK. T1 - Elves in Anglo-Saxon England.

T2 - Matters of Belief, Health, Gender and Identity. AU - Hall, Alaric. PY - Y1 - M3 - Book. Helps illuminate Anglo-Saxon social attitudes towards the supernatural, health and gender, and shows how texts can be as important in the shaping of social realities as they are in recording them.

HISTORICAL JOURNAL Anglo-Saxon elves (Old English ælfe) are the best attested Brand: Boydell & Brewer, Limited. Elves in Anglo-Saxon England. Written by Alaric Hall Review by Sarah Bower. This is the eighth volume in the Boydell Press’ Anglo-Saxon Studies series and is an unashamedly academic book, a valuable contribution to the publisher’s aim of providing ‘a forum for the best scholarship in the Anglo-Saxon Author: Alaric Hall.

Anglo-Saxon elves [Old English ælfe] are one of the best attested non-Christian beliefs in early medieval Europe, but current interpretations of the evidence derive directly from outdated nineteenth- and early twentieth-century ating linguistic and textual approaches into an anthropologically-inspired framework, this book reassesses the full range of s: 9.

I don’t have the time or expertise to cover all of the Anglo-Saxon beliefs and mythology, but I thought I could give a brief overview of their mythologies about elves, seeing as I did some research on this in writing my first novel, Wilding: Book One of the Traveller’s Path (coming early ).

I was struck in reading chapter six of Tolkien’s The Book of Lost Tales, Part Two () how attention to “A great battle between Men at the Heath of the Sky-roof” enters into his early thinking about direct Anglo-Saxon contact with Elves, and suppose this refers to Heavenfield (which he mentions by name in “Beowulf: The Monsters and.

^ Book Elves In Anglo Saxon England Anglo Saxon Studies ^ Uploaded By J. Tolkien, anglo saxon elves old english aelfe are one of the best attested non christian beliefs in early medieval europe but current interpretations of the evidence derive directly from outdated nineteenth and early twentieth century scholarship integrating.

Buy Elves in Anglo-Saxon England: Matters of Belief, Health, Gender and Identity (Anglo-Saxon Studies) Reprint by Hall, Alaric (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible s: 9.

A wonderful amount of information about them can be found in Alaric Hall’s Elves in Anglo-Saxon England, who argues with the typical scholarly view of elves.

Consultare utili recensioni cliente e valutazioni per Elves in Anglo-Saxon England: Matters of Belief, Health, Gender and Identity by Alaric Hall (Octo) su Consultare recensioni obiettive e imparziali sui prodotti, fornite dagli utenti.

A medieval Scandinavian context --The earliest Anglo-Saxon evidence --Female elves and beautiful elves --Ælfe, illness and healing (1): the 'elf-shot' conspiracy --Ælfe, illness and healing (2): ælfsiden --Anglo-Saxon myth and gender --Believing in early medieval history --Appendix 1: The linguistic history of elf --Appendix 2: Two non.

COUPON: Rent Elves in Anglo-Saxon England Matters of Belief, Health, Gender and Identity 1st edition () and save up to 80% on textbook rentals and 90% on used textbooks. Get FREE 7-day instant eTextbook access. An elf (plural: elves) is a type of humanlike supernatural being in Germanic mythology and medieval Germanic-speaking cultures, elves seem generally to have been thought of as beings with magical powers and supernatural beauty, ambivalent towards everyday people and capable of either helping or hindering them.

However, the details of these beliefs have varied considerably over time. Elves in Anglo‐Saxon England: Matters of Belief, Health, Gender and Identity.

By Alaric Hall. Woodbridge: The Boydell Press. xi + pp. £45 (hardback). ISBN 1 2. A recent addition to the interdisciplinary Anglo‐Saxon Studies series, Alaric Hall's survey of elf‐beliefs ‘from pre‐conversion times to the eleventh century’ offers a welcome reappraisal of.

This article could not have been written without Alaric Hall's wonderful book Elves in Anglo-Saxon England: Matters of belief, health, gender and identity.

This is based on his PhD thesis which is available online (The Meanings of Elf, and Elves, in Medieval England). Integrating linguistic and textual approaches into an anthropologically-inspired framework, Elves in Anglo-Saxon England reassesses the full range of evidence.

It traces continuities and changes in medieval non-Christian beliefs with a new degree of reliability, from pre-conversion times to the eleventh century and beyond. Aspects of Anglo-Saxon Magic (Revised edition).

Hockwold-cum-Wilton, Norfolk: Anglo-Saxon Books. ISBN Hall, Alaric (). Elves in Anglo-Saxon England: Matters of Belief, Health, Gender and Identity. Woodbridge: Boydell Books. ISBN Hutton, Ronald (). Blood and Mistletoe: The History of the Druids in. Quick note: this post was triggered by a book, Elves in Anglo-Saxon England: Matters of Belief, Health, Gender and Identity (Anglo-Saxon Studies) by Alaric Hall (Boydell Press, ).

It's a very dense text stuffed with erudition and teeny tiny footnotes. But this is not an academic blog; long, footnoted discussion of etymology, of gloss and lemma and long -i, would be intrusive and tiresome. In tenth- and eleventh-century England, Anglo-Saxon Christians retained an old folk belief in elves as extremely dangerous creatures capable of harming unwary humans.

To ward off the afflictions caused by these invisible beings, Christian priests modified traditional elf charms by Price: $ Alaric Hall is the author of Elves in Anglo-Saxon England ( avg rating, 51 ratings, 9 reviews, published ), Leeds Studies in English ( av /5.

Get this from a library. Elves in Anglo-Saxon England: matters of belief, health, gender and identity. [Alaric Hall] -- "Anglo-Saxon elves (Old English alfe) are one of the best attested non-Christian beliefs in early medieval Europe.

Current interpretations of the evidence, however, derive directly from outdated. Title: Elves in Anglo-Saxon England: Matters of Belief, Health, Gender and Identity Publisher: Boydell Press Author: Alaric Hall Pages: pp ISBN: / Price: $ US Woefully little is known about the mythological ancestor of the modern day elf, despite the frequency with which they appear in modern fantasy epics, both written and filmed, tabletop.

In Anglo-Saxon England, we find a similar dual attitude towards elves. Their dark and dangerous side is attested by Old English words for nightmare and physical ailments, such ælf-adl ‘elf disease, nightmare’, ælf – siden ‘elf’s influence, nightmare’, ælf-sogoða ‘hiccough’ and wæterælf-adl ‘water elf disease’.

This fully-illustrated study addresses the disputed roles of Anglo-Saxon women within medieval scholarship. Originally cast as the companions and equals of men, women have more recently appeared in Anglo-Saxon accounts as servants and slaves, habitually beaten, disregarded and abused.

A passage mentioning elves, from Beowulf, England, 1st quarter of 11th century, Cotton MS Vitellius A XV, f. However, elves may not always have entirely negative connotations in Anglo-Saxon lore. In Anglo-Saxon England, elves (aelfe) were viewed as malevolent beings who could bring harm to humans.

In the 10th century Metrical Charm "Against A Sudden Stitch" (Wið færstice), it states that various forms of sickness, such as rheumatism, could be induced by "elfshot" - arrows fired by elves. England and Englishness appear in J. R. R. Tolkien's Middle-earth, more or less thinly disguised, in the form of the Shire and the lands close to it; in kindly characters such as Treebeard, Faramir, and Théoden; in its industrialised state as Isengard and Mordor; and as Anglo-Saxon England inand most pervasively, Englishness appears in the words and behaviour of the hobbits.Set in Anglo-Saxon Kent, this book tells the story of a slave boy called Bron, who is drawn into a gripping adventure with warlords, warriors and kings.

The story is well researched and makes it easy for pupils to engage imaginatively with the historical setting as seen through the eyes of a child.In Anglo-Saxon England as early as the 10th century, Old English medical books attest to elves afflicting humans and livestock by "elf-shots".

The German elf or alp was seen as an " addler " of people in medical books, but already in the High Middle Ages there were prayers warding against it as the agent causing nightmares, and eventually for.

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